5 SA entrepreneurs whose blogs and websites you should be reading

Expect industry insights, inspiration and advice for navigating the entrepreneurial journey


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In an effort to set themselves apart and to establish themselves as thought leaders in their fields, it's becoming increasingly common to find entrepreneurs writing and maintaining blogs.

These blogs or websites are often platforms allowing entrepreneurs to share their experiences and insights into their fields as well as the ins-and-outs of their businesses. 

Perhaps the most well known entrepreneur-blogger is Seth Godin, an American author of 11 books including Purple Cow, speaker and entrepreneur who has founded various businesses including an alternative MBA program. His blog is considered one of the most popular in the world.

Another example is Brian Clark, an American online writer and entrepreneur whose blog, Copyblogger focuses on content marketing has became so successful that he was able to launch a multimillion dollar business creating software and services for content creators.

South Africa has no shortage of entrepreneur-bloggers to choose from in a range of industries including finance, fintech and communication, among others. We share some of our favourites and the reasons you should be following them. 

Lynette Ntuli

Lynette Ntuli, Innate Investment Solutions 
Lynette Ntuli is the founder and CEO of Innate Investment Solutions, a property, asset and infrastructure development and solutions firm. 

Why she's worth following: On her blog, Lynette Ntuli In More Than 140 characters, Ntuli shares insights on her work and experiences. This includes writing about property, entrepreneurship, youth development and women empowerment. Ntuli also shares content from SME Funding, a show she hosts on Business Day TV, that seeks to facilitate entrepreneurship.

See also: Lynette Ntuli's 5 ways to become a next gen woman leader

What to expect: "You had a purpose before they had an opinion. Let them experience your light, but never let them touch it. Because once they touch it, they will come for your intensity, brilliance and reach. A reputation is a heavy thing to carry, if it’s definition is crafted and controlled by others. Protect the source. #SaturdayMusings #ThingsIveLearned #UncontrolledBrilliance #LimitlessLife."

 

Murray Legg

Murray Legg, Webfluential and Retroviral
Murray Legg is the co-founder of Retroviral, an online communication agency and Webfluential, an online platform that connects brands and social influencers.

Why he's worth following: His blog, Murray's Blog: My Personal Collection of Thoughts offers a combination of his personal experiences and thoughts on investing, entrepreneurship and innovation. 

What to expect: "There’s something called the illusion of explanatory depth, where people believe that they know more than they actually do. People mistake their ability to recognize the logical operation of something with their ability to understand and explain it. Then there’s the things we don’t know until we discover them, the unknown unknowns....Running your own business has a lot of these two aspects, the belief in yourself that you know more than you actually do, and the stark reality of having to deal with unknown unknowns when they make themselves known."

 

 

Vusi Thembekwayo

Vusi Thembekwayo, Motiv8
Speaker and business mogul, Vusi Thembekwayo established Motiv8, a human resources management and development consultancy. He is also the youngest JSE director in South Africa, an investor, member of several boards and the chairman of My Growth Fund, a venture capitalist start-up. 

Why he's worth following: On his website, Vusi Thembekwayo: The Rock Star of Public Speaking, Thembekwayo shares expert knowledge on business and offers research finding that can help entrepreneurs grow their businesses. 

What to expect: "I just recently celebrated a decade in business. Having reached this milestone got me thinking whether or not the things that they say we need in business and the phases we experience are true? Are the first 999 days the not crucial? Do all businesses suffer a near fatal fiduciary crisis in the five to seven year period?"

 

 

Simon Dingle

Simon Dingle, Phantom Design and inves
Simon Dingle is a technologist, designer and an entrepreneur. Much of Dingle's focus is on fintech having founded inves, an online app that simplifies investing in new asset classes such as Bitcoin.

He has also worked closely with other fintech companies such as 22seven and BitX in Singapore. Dingle also serves as an advisor at Alpha Code, a fintech development hub. 

Why he's worth following: On his self-titled website, Simon Dingle, Dingle takes a philosophical view on design, technology and money while sharing a personal opinion on much of the world's interesting challenges. 

See also: Why it's important to fail in the right direction​

What to expect: "Curious minds greet change with a sense of nostalgia. They know that sometimes bad news leads to great things. That the best tidings in the world can hide a terrible new reality. They understand that "I don't know" is the only honest answer to any question, and that all just is."

 

 

Melanie Hawken

Melanie Hawken, Lionesses of Africa
​Malenie Hawken is the founder and editor-in-chief of Lionesses of Africa, an online platform that showcases Africa's women entrepreneurs and celebrates their entrepreneurial success. 

Why she's worth following: Lionesses of Africa creates a networking space and community of entrepreneurs and aspiring entrepreneurs, and seeks to support the dreams of the next generation of women. Its blog focuses on offering regular business advice from pioneering women. They feature inspiring women from across the African continent including IT solutions provider from Nigeria, food manufacturing in Zambia and African footwear in Ethiopia. 

What to expect: "The idea of being an entrepreneur and a mom at the same time may cause goose bumps in some women, let alone if the business is a start-up or is having some bumpy and rough times in its growth phase. To many women such businesses do not need additional disturbances from family members, be it a husband, children or even relatives, but would rather attend to all business issues 24/7 and 365 days a year without a break."

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